A treatise on the materia medica, intended as a sequel to the pharmacopoeia of the United States: being an account of the origin, qualities and medical uses of the articles and compounds, which constitute that work, with their modes of prescription and administration. Jacob BIGELOW.

A treatise on the materia medica, intended as a sequel to the pharmacopoeia of the United States: being an account of the origin, qualities and medical uses of the articles and compounds, which constitute that work, with their modes of prescription and administration.

Boston: Charles Ewer, 1822. 8vo. 424 pp. Contemporary calf, rebacked with the original backstrip laid down, spine label; an excellent copy. Item #17288

Bigelow, co-author of the first national pharmacopoeia, intended that America would have a “single unified materia medica.” In this treatise on the properties of drugs, he expands on the pharmacopoeia by “examining the sources from which [the botanical material] is derived, the properties by which they are known, the objectives which they fulfill in practice, and the manner in which they are to be applied” (preface).

Bigelow (1786-1879) earned his M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania. He was a Harvard professor and medical practitioner in Boston for sixty years. Although he worked and lectured in the medical field, Bigelow’s true love was botany. He compiled a three-volume survey of the medicinal plants of the United States, American Medical Botany, one of the first two books in America to include plates printed in color.

Price: $500.00

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